LIT Conversations

Community COnversation STL, STRIDE, LIT logos

The Scituate Town Library and STRIDE invite you to a LIT Conversation.
April 4 | 6 - 7:30 PM | Scituate Town Library Community Room
 

sister city logos in a row scituate sucy-en-brie west cork santa catrina de fogoThe Scituate Town Library and Scituate Together for Representation, Inclusion, Diversity & Equity (STRIDE), invite you to a LIT Conversation, featuring Jamele Adams as facilitator. LIT means Love, Inclusion, and Trust.  Our final conversation of the year will focus on an introduction to the Town's Sister City Committees. Learn all about how Scituate is seeking to expand the cultural landscape of our town and making important international connections with towns in France, Ireland, and Cape Verde. How do these connections enrich our community? What role do Sister City Committees currently play, and how can we support them in their work? Visit our website to learn about our existing Sister Cities, how Sister City programs began, and a little information from our databases about the countries we currently partner with.

This community conversation will be held in person on April 4th from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Scituate Town Library.

 

Our conversation agreement is as follows:

-Be curious and listen actively to understand how others' experiences have shaped their perspectives.
-Show respect by suspending judgment; setting aside judgment opens you up to learning from others.
-Note common ground as well as differences. Seek to understand, rather than to persuade. Question your own assumptions and look for new insights.
-Be your authentic self; speak from your own experiences and with sincerity.
-Be purposeful and concise, so that others have time to share.
-Be conscious of your use of body language and nonverbal responses.

For optional reading in advance, you may find these items useful:

Sister Cities International
Cork Sister City
Sucy-en-Brie Sister City
Santa Catarina do Fogo Sister City

 


Community COnversation STL, STRIDE, LIT logos

 

The Scituate Town Library and STRIDE invite you to a LIT Conversation.
February 7 | 6 - 7:30 PM | Scituate Town Library Community Room


The Scituate Town Library and Scituate Together for Representation, Inclusion, Diversity & Equity (STRIDE), invite you to a LIT Conversation, featuring Jamele Adams as facilitator. LIT means Love, Inclusion, and Trust. Our next conversation will explore the topic of food insecurity in our community and we will be joined by Jim Pollard, Director of Outreach at the Scituate Food Pantry. You will find resources available on this topic at the Scituate Town Library website (www.bit.ly/LITScituate).

This community conversation will be held in person on February 7th from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Scituate Town Library.

Our conversation agreement is as follows:

-Be curious and listen actively to understand how others' experiences have shaped their perspectives.
-Show respect by suspending judgment; setting aside judgment opens you up to learning from others.
-Note common ground as well as differences. Seek to understand, rather than to persuade. Question your own assumptions and look for new insights.
-Be your authentic self; speak from your own experiences and with sincerity.
-Be purposeful and concise, so that others have time to share.
-Be conscious of your use of body language and nonverbal responses.

For optional reading in advance, you may find these items useful:
Press release Greater Boston Food Bank Releases Second Annual Report on Food Insecurity, Equity and Access in Massachusetts
Report by GBFB Opportunities to Improve Food Equity & Access
Poetry x Hunger Project Poets Speak Back to Hunger

To learn more about how to access or donate to the Scituate Food Pantry, please visit their website.


Community COnversation STL, STRIDE, LIT logos

 

The Scituate Town Library and STRIDE invite you to a LIT Conversation.
October 18 | 6 - 7:30 PM | Scituate Town Library Community Room

 

The Scituate Town Library and Scituate Together for Representation, Inclusion, Diversity & Equity (STRIDE), invite you to a LIT Conversation, featuring Jamele Adams as facilitator. LIT means Love, Inclusion, and Trust. This is the first in a series of conversations that will take place between October and April on a variety of topics.  Our first conversation will explore the pandemic and its effects on our sense of community: what lessons have we learned? What's the path forward? Is the pandemic truly over? This community conversation will be held in person on October 18 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Scituate Town Library's Community Room. 

For optional reading in advance of the conversation, we offer this piece by Tommy Orange. You can access this short story, printed in the New York Times, from home with your library card. Instructions for reading the Times from home can be found here.

Our conversation agreement is as follows:

-Be curious and listen actively to understand how others' experiences have shaped their perspectives.
-Show respect by suspending judgment; setting aside judgment opens you up to learning from others.
-Note common ground as well as differences. Seek to understand, rather than to persuade. Question your own assumptions and look for new insights.
-Be your authentic self; speak from your own experiences and with sincerity.
-Be purposeful and concise, so that others have time to share.
-Be conscious of your use of body language and nonverbal responses.


LIT logo, STRIDE Logo, STL Logo and the words Community Conversation in Blue

The Scituate Town Library and STRIDE invite you to a LIT Conversation.
 

The Scituate Town Library and Scituate Together for Representation, Inclusion, Diversity & Equity (STRIDE), invite you to a LIT Conversation, featuring Jamele Adams as facilitator. LIT means Love, Inclusion, and Trust. We'll watch a short explainer video produced by Netflix and Vox Media about the racial wealth gap. After viewing, we'll have a conversation on how we can work toward solving inequities and injustices. This community conversation will be held in person on May 3rd from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Scituate Town Library. 

Our conversation agreement is as follows:

-Be curious and listen actively to understand how others' experiences have shaped their perspectives.
-Show respect by suspending judgment; setting aside judgment opens you up to learning from others.
-Note common ground as well as differences. Seek to understand, rather than to persuade. Question your own assumptions and look for new insights.
-Be your authentic self; speak from your own experiences and with sincerity.
-Be purposeful and concise, so that others have time to share.
-Be conscious of your use of body language and nonverbal responses.

Suggested further learning resources:

Books:
The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We can Prosper Together
by Heather McGhee
The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein
Through a Trail of Tears: a Black Family's Story of Generational Wealth by Gloria Petgrave Scoggins 

Interview:
Interview between Richard Rothstein and Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Documentary on Kanopy (access with your library card):
Angelini, G. (Director). (2019). Owned: A Tale of Two Americas [Video file]. Gravitas Ventures. Retrieved April 14, 2022, from Kanopy.

 


Community Conversations Logo with STL, STRIDE, and LITPAG

The Scituate Town Library, Scituate Public Schools' LITPAG, and STRIDE invite you to a LIT Conversation! 


Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King in a jail cell at Birmingham Jail

LIT means Love, Inclusion, and Trust. Please read Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in advance of the community conversation. We'll talk about King's messages and how they resonate today, what's changed and what hasn't, and how we can work toward solving inequities and injustices. See below for additional resources.

Sign up here to join the conversation! You'll note that there the registration form asks you to read and agree to conversation norms. The conversation agreement is as follows:

-Be curious and listen actively to understand how others' experiences have shaped their perspectives.
-Show respect by suspending judgment; setting aside judgment opens you up to learning from others.
-Note common ground as well as differences. Seek to understand, rather than to persuade. Question your own assumptions and look for new insights.
-Be your authentic self; speak from your own experiences and with sincerity.
-Be purposeful and concise, so that others have time to share.
-Be conscious of your use of body language and nonverbal responses.

 

the original hand typed letter from Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King
Suggested further learning resources:
 

Supplemental works:
"While jailed, King wrote notes in the margins of the Birmingham News, reaching out to most of the eight white clergymen. Those notes, passed through a jail trusty and then to King’s lawyers, were transcribed by a secretary and compiled into a letter that would then be sent out to seven of the eight clergymen." The news article about the digitized copy of the letter can be found here.   

A reading of Letter from Birmingham Jail has been produced by the Kirwan Institute and can be found here

A summary of the key points of Letter from Birmingham Jail by the King Institute at Stanford can be found here.

 

Documentaries from Kanopy (access with your library card number):
Williams, L. Gladsjo, L. Streeter, S. McMahon, T. (Director). (2016). Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise [Video file]. PBS. 

Richards, H. (Director). (1963). Freedom March [Video file]. Estuary Press. 

In Remembrance of Martin [Video file]. PBS. 

Nelson, S. (Director). (2014). Freedom Summer [Video file]. PBS. 

Articles:
White Allies: Your Anger Belongs in the Streets, Not at Home, by Dr. David Campt

King's Message of Nonviolence Has Been Distorted 

Books:
April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Death and How it Changed America by Dyson, Michael Eric

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together by Heather McGhee

Questions to get you thinking, but please bring your own!
King expresses disappointment with the white moderate. Why is that the case? Is this still a problem?

How do we, as a society, define an unjust law, and what kinds of strategies and tactics have proven most effective in changing such laws? If we are able to abolish legal injustice will it necessarily result in social justice?  

What does the quote "injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere" mean to you today? Does it mean the same thing it did when King wrote it?

For questions about the program or registration, please contact Jessi Finnie, Library Director or Jamele Adams, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for Scituate Public Schools.